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There are a variety of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries wherein exercises play a vital role in the rehabilitation process. The following instructions are meant for you to disseminate to your patients. Feel free to make them part of your prescription. Individualize the regimen and emphasize proper technique. It is better to demonstrate it while they are in the office with you and have them demonstrate it back. Keep it simple and generally do not exceed three exercises as much as possible keeping in mind they have to do several repetitions for the program to be effective. Like taking medications, the more they have to do, the less adherent they become. Remind them on how they should progress forward depending on their clinical conditions. The stretching exercises should not be painful; otherwise it is time to hold back a little. Give them positive reinforcements on follow-up visits as appropriate. For the healthy ones who are interested in doing home exercises, you can also share these with them. The number of sets and repetitions may vary depending upon the goal of the exercise as well as the stage at which the athlete has progressed in rehabilitation. The number of sets range between 1 and 3 and the repetitions per set range between 8 and 15 (see Ch. 5).

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See Figures C-1, C-2, C-3, C-4, C-5, C-6, C-7, C-8, and C-9 with corresponding captions describing the exercises.

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Figure C-1
Graphic Jump LocationGraphic Jump Location

Active extension and flexion (Figure C-1): Sit on a chair. Tighten your front thigh muscle and raise your heel off the floor and straighten your knee. Hold for — seconds. Repeat — sets of —.

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Figure C-2
Graphic Jump LocationGraphic Jump LocationGraphic Jump Location

Quadriceps short arcs (Figure C-2): Lie flat and place a towel roll under your knee. Tighten your front thigh muscle and raise your heel off the floor. Hold for — seconds. Repeat — sets of —.

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Figure C-3
Graphic Jump LocationGraphic Jump LocationGraphic Jump Location

Straight leg raises (Figure C-3): Lie flat on your back. Tighten your front thigh muscle as hard as you can. Slowly raise your leg. Relax and then lower your leg slowly keeping your knee straight throughout. Repeat — sets of —.

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