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  • 850 Concussion
  • 850.0 With no loss of consciousness
  • 850.11 With brief loss of consciousness (less than 30 minutes)
  • 850.12 With brief loss of consciousness (31 to 59 minutes)
  • 850.2 With moderate loss of consciousness (1 to 24 hours)
  • 850.3 With prolonged loss of consciousness and return to pre-existing consciousness level (24 hours + with full recovery)
  • 850.4 With prolonged loss of consciousness, without return to pre-existing consciousness level
  • 850.5 Loss of consciousness of unspecified duration
  • 850.9 Concussion unspecified

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  • S06.0 Concussion
  • S06.0X0A Without loss of consciousness, initial encounter
  • S06.0X0D Without loss of consciousness, subsequent encounter
  • S06.0X0S Without loss of consciousness, sequela
  • S06.0X1 Concussion with loss of consciousness of 30 minutes or less
  • S06.0X2 Concussion with loss of consciousness of 31 minutes to 59 minutes
  • S06.0X3 Concussion with loss of consciousness of 1 hour to 5 hours 59 minutes
  • S06.0X4 Concussion with loss of consciousness of 6 hours to 24 hours, initial encounter
  • S06.0X5 Concussion with loss of consciousness greater than 24 hours with return to pre existing conscious level
  • S06.0X6 Concussion with loss of consciousness greater than 24 hours without return to pre-existing conscious level with patient surviving
  • S06.0X7 Concussion with loss of consciousness of any duration with death due to brain injury prior to regaining consciousness
  • S06.0X8 Concussion with loss of consciousness of any duration with death due to other cause prior to regaining consciousness
  • S06.0X9 Concussion with loss of consciousness of unspecified duration

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Description

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  • Complex pathophysiological process affecting the brain; induced by traumatic biomechanical force2
  • May be caused by direct blow to the head, face, neck, elsewhere on the body with impulsive force transmitted to the head
  • May occur from linear deceleration injury or rotational injury3
    • Seventeen times more likely to occur with linear acceleration > 100g
    • Fourteen times more likely to occur with rotational acceleration > 5000 rad/sec
  • “Simple” vs. “Complex” concussions4,5
    • Simple: symptoms resolve in 7-10 days, no intervention beyond limiting play, rest until symptoms resolve
    • Complex: symptoms persist > 10 days or loss of consciousness > 1 minute; neuropsychological testing and multidisciplinary approach recommended for individuals with history of head injuries
    • Complex concussions 18x more likely than simple concussions to have impaired composite scores on neurocognitive testing for 3 out of 4 on visual memory, reaction time, processing speed, or symptom scores
  • Second impact syndrome: life-threatening condition, may be triggered by very minor impact while individual still suffering symptoms of initial concussion6

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Essentials of Diagnosis

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