Skip to Main Content

++

  • Collapsed lung
  • Spontaneous pneumothorax
  • Pneumothoraces (plural form of disorder)

++

  • 512.0 Pneumothorax and air leak
  • 860 Traumatic pneumothorax and hemothorax

++

  • 780.7 Malaise and fatigue
  • 786.0 Dyspnea and respiratory abnormalities
  • 786.05 Shortness of breath

++

  • J93.0 Spontaneous tension pneumothorax
  • J93.11 Primary spontaneous pneumothorax
  • J93.12 Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax
  • J93.81 Chronic pneumothorax
  • J93.82 Other air leak
  • J93.83 Other pneumothorax
  • J93.9 Pneumothorax, unspecified
  • J95.811 Postprocedural pneumothorax
  • J95.812 Postprocedural air leak
  • S21.309A Unspecified open wound of unspecified front wall of thorax with penetration into thoracic cavity, initial encounter
  • S27.0XXA Traumatic pneumothorax, initial encounter
  • S27.1XXA Traumatic hemothorax, initial encounter
  • S27.2XXA Traumatic hemopneumothorax, initial encounter

++
++

Description

++

  • Collapsed lung occurs from air in the region around the lung
  • Pressure on the lung prevents expansion of the lung with inhalation
  • Chest pain with breathing

++

Essentials of Diagnosis

++

  • Spontaneous pneumothorax (PTX) can occur with no etiology
  • Focal area of absent breath sounds2
  • Iatrogenic PTX4
    • From a complication from a diagnostic or treatment procedure
  • Tension PTX4
    • Air enters the pleural space but can not escape
  • Primary pneumothorax
    • Unknown cause
  • Secondary pneumothorax
    • Known cause

++

General Considerations

++

  • Can be caused by
  • Can be life threatening
  • May need a chest tube

++

Demographics

++

  • More common in tall and thin individuals
  • Spontaneously in newborns and in older children
  • Males (16 to 24) with high risk trauma activities3

++

Signs and Symptoms

++

  • Sudden shortness of breath2
  • Focal area of absent breath sounds2
  • Chest pain; worsens with deep breath or cough
  • Cyanosis
  • Fatigue
  • Increased heart rate
  • Decreased oxygenation throughout the body
  • Nasal flaring
  • Hypotension (low blood pressure)
  • Chest tightness
  • Raising shoulders allows increased lung air flow
  • Tensed muscles from dyspnea

++

Functional Implications

++

  • If spontaneous pneumothorax, patient prohibited from air travel until completely healed
  • Disabling dyspnea when performing simple tasks
    • Arm elevation to reach into cabinet
    • Decreased exercise tolerance
    • Inability to function at work secondary to respiratory problems

++

Possible Contributing Causes

++

  • Having had a previous pneumothorax
  • Rib fracture
  • Gunshot to lungs
  • Puncture wound to lungs
  • Lung rupture (small region)
  • Acute complication of tracheostomy2
  • Asthma
  • Measles
  • Congenital malformation
  • Smoking
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Tuberculosis
  • Whooping cough
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

++

Differential Diagnoses

++

  • Diaphragmatic hernia
  • Influenza
  • Measles
  • Asthma
  • Chickenpox
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Ludwig’s angina
  • Bronchiectasis
  • Congenital lobar emphysema
  • Cystic fibrosis (CF)
  • Kawasaki disease (KD)
  • Bronchitis
  • Goiter
  • Upper respiratory tract infection
  • Central airway obstruction
  • Lung cysts/tumor
  • Tuberculosis

++

Laboratory ...

Want remote access to your institution's subscription?

Sign in to your MyAccess profile while you are actively authenticated on this site via your institution (you will be able to verify this by looking at the top right corner of the screen - if you see your institution's name, you are authenticated). Once logged in to your MyAccess profile, you will be able to access your institution's subscription for 90 days from any location. You must be logged in while authenticated at least once every 90 days to maintain this remote access.

Ok

About MyAccess

If your institution subscribes to this resource, and you don't have a MyAccess profile, please contact your library's reference desk for information on how to gain access to this resource from off-campus.

Subscription Options

AccessPhysiotherapy Full Site: One-Year Subscription

Connect to the full suite of AccessPhysiotherapy content and resources including interactive NPTE review, more than 500 videos, Anatomy & Physiology Revealed, 20+ leading textbooks, and more.

$595 USD
Buy Now

Pay Per View: Timed Access to all of AccessPhysiotherapy

24 Hour Subscription $34.95

Buy Now

48 Hour Subscription $54.95

Buy Now

Pop-up div Successfully Displayed

This div only appears when the trigger link is hovered over. Otherwise it is hidden from view.