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OBJECTIVES

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When you finish this chapter you will be able to:

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  • Describe the major anatomical features of the thigh, hip, groin, and pelvis as they relate to sports injuries.

  • Identify the major sports injuries to the thigh, hip, groin, and pelvis.

  • Demonstrate appropriate emergency procedures for injuries to the thigh, groin, and pelvis.

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INTRODUCTION

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Although the thigh, hip, groin, and pelvis have lower incidences of injury than do the knee and lower limb, they receive considerable trauma from a variety of sports activities.30 Of major concern are thigh strains and contusions and chronic and overuse stresses affecting the thigh and hip.

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ANATOMY OF THE THIGH, HIP, GROIN, AND PELVIC REGION

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Bones
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Thigh
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The thigh is generally considered that part of the leg between the hip and the knee. The femur is the longest and strongest bone in the body (Figure 17–1). It is designed for maximum support and mobility during weight-bearing activity. The proximal head of the femur articulates with the acetabulum of the pelvis to form the hip joint and the distal femoral condyles articulate with the tibia at the knee joint.

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FIGURE 17–1

Femur (anterior view). (From Saladin, KS: Anatomy and physiology, ed. 5, Dubuque, IA: McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2010.)

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Innominate bones:

  • Ilium

  • Ischium

  • Pubis

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Pelvis
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The pelvis is a bony ring formed by two innominate bones, the sacrum, and the coccyx (Figure 17–2). The two innominate bones are each made up of an ilium, ischium, and pubis (Figure 17–3). The functions of the pelvis are to support the spine and trunk and to transfer their weight to the lower limbs. In addition to providing skeletal support, the pelvis serves as a place of attachment for the trunk and thigh muscles and protection for the pelvic organs.

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FIGURE 17–2

Pelvis (anterior view). (From Saladin, KS: Anatomy and physiology, ed. 5, Dubuque, IA: McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2010.)

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FIGURE 17–3

Innominate bone (lateral view). (From Saladin, KS: Anatomy and physiology, ed. 5, Dubuque, IA: McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2010.)

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The hip and pelvis form the core for full body movement. The body’s center of gravity is just in front of the upper part of the sacrum. Injuries to the hip or pelvis cause the athlete disability in the lower limb or trunk or both.4

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Ligaments
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The hip joint is formed by ...

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