Skip to Main Content

OBJECTIVES

When you finish this chapter you should be able to

  • Recognize the normal structural anatomy of the thigh.

  • Conduct an assessment of the injured thigh.

  • Correctly recognize the various injuries that can occur to the anatomical structures in the thigh.

  • Review the anatomy of the hip, groin, and pelvic region.

  • Accurately evaluate injuries that occur in or around the hip, groin, and pelvis.

  • Outline the etiology, symptoms and signs, and management procedures for the injuries that occur in the hip, groin, and pelvis.

  • Develop a generalized rehabilitation plan for dealing with injuries to the thigh, hip, groin, and pelvis.

CONNECT HIGHLIGHTS

Visit http://connect.mcgraw-hill.com for further exercises to apply your knowledge:

  • Clinical application scenarios covering assessment and recognition of thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis injuries, etiology; symptoms and signs, and management of thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis injuries; and rehabilitation for the thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis

  • Click-and-drag questions covering structural anatomy of the thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis; assessment of thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis injuries; and rehabilitation plan of the thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis

  • Multiple-choice questions covering anatomy, assessment, etiology, management and rehabilitation of thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis injuries

  • Selection questions covering rehabilitation plan for various injuries to the thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis

  • Video identification of special tests for the thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis injuries; rehabilitation techniques for the thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis, taping; and wrapping for thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis injuries

  • Picture identification of major anatomical components of the thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis; rehabilitation techniques of the thigh, groin, hip, and pelvis; and therapeutic modalities for management

INTRODUCTION

Although the thigh, hip, groin, and pelvis have relatively lower incidences of injury than the knee and ankle, they are subject to considerable trauma from a variety of activities.22

ANATOMY OF THE THIGH

The thigh is generally considered that part of the leg between the hip and the knee. Several important anatomical units must be considered in terms of their relationship to injury: the shaft of the femur, the musculature, the nerves and blood vessels, and the fascia that envelops the thigh.

Bones

The femur (Figure 21–1) is the longest and strongest bone in the body and is designed to permit maximum mobility and support during locomotion. The cylindrical shaft is bowed anterior and lateral to accommodate the stresses placed on it during bending of the hip and knee and during weight bearing. The proximal head of the femur articulates with the pelvis to form the hip joint, and the distal femoral condyles articulate with the tibia at the knee joint.

FIGURE 21–1

The femur. (A) Anterior view. (B) Posterior view.

...

Pop-up div Successfully Displayed

This div only appears when the trigger link is hovered over. Otherwise it is hidden from view.